Smith & Wesson Model 625

The Smith & Wesson Model 625, is a six shot double action revolver chambered for the .45 ACP cartridge. The 625 will head space the .45 ACP cartridge in the chambers without use of moon clips, but since the extractor star cannot engage the rimless cartridge, moon clips are needed to facilitate ejection.

The Model 625, based on the large N revolver frame,  was introduced as the .45 CAL MODEL OF 1988, in 1988. It was equipped with a 5 inch barrel with a full-length under lug and was offered originally as a limited edition model intended as an IPSC commemorative.

The regular production model of the Model 625 was introduced in 1989. In 1991 – 1992, it was also made with 3″ and 4″ barrels.

Current standard offerings now only include the 4″ and 5″ barrel.

The Smith &Wesson Model 625 Mountain Gun is a lighter version of the 625. The standard Model 625 Mountain Gun fires .45 Colt through a 4 inch barrel. In 2001, a limited edition was also built by the Smith & Wesson Performance Center that uses .45 ACP ammunition. Both of these revolvers have Hogue rubber grips and adjustable rear sights.

The newest version, the Model 625-10, was introduced in 2004 from the Smith & Wesson Performance Center. It is a snub-nosed version of the 625. The S&W Model 625-10 is a stainless steel update of the Model 25, popular before World War 2 as a starting gun for conversion to a “Fitz Special” (a concealed, contact-distance defensive gun).

The S&W Model 625JM, another recent Performance Center version, , was introduced in 2005. JM standing for Jerry Miculek, a renowned revolver shooter, and is his personal design. The Model 625JM uses a 4 inch barrel with a gold bead black partridge front sight and rear adjustable sights. The Model 625JM is finished in matte bead-blasted stainless steel. The grips are Jerry Miculek’s own design.

Latest .45 ACP revolver in the line up from Smith & Wesson is the Model 325 Night Guard. It is similar to the 625-10 in that the frame is an aluminum scandium blend. It has a similar grooved rear sight as the 625-10, but the front sight of the 325 Night Guard is a tritium night sight. The model 325 has a matte black finish.

Variants of the 625

  • S&W Model 625 (US – Revolver – .45 ACP: .45 Target Stainless)
  • S&W Model 625 Mountain Gun US – Revolver – .45 ACP: Model of 1989 .45 Light Weight 39.5 oz (1.1 kg)
  • S&W Model 625-10 (US – Revolver – .45 ACP: .45 Target Stainless)
  • S&W Model 625JM (US – Revolver – .45 ACP: Jerry Miculek design)
  • 625-2 (1988) Some have a “floating hand” that has been criticized. Only made in 5″ barrel.
  • 625-3 (1989) Very desireable. Made in 3,4 and 5″ barrels.
  • 625-4 (1994) Same as -3, except case colored hammer and trigger, drilled and tapped for scope mounts with new style rear sight.
  • 625-5 (.45 Colt)
  • 625-6 (1998) MIM hammer and trigger, internal firing pin. Several barrel styles, including PC guns.
  • 625-7 (.45 Colt) Some ACP examples may exist.
  • 625-8 Internal lock. 4 and 5″ barrels.
  • 625-9 (.45 Colt)
  • 625-10 PC snub nose, fixed sight, internal lock.
  • 625-11 (.45 colt version of -10)

Unless you are looking for a specific Performance Center gun, most folks consider the Model 625 with the -3 and -4 designations to be the highest quality, with best resale value.

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4 Responses to Smith & Wesson Model 625

  1. Chris says:

    Great info!!

    Does anyone know in what magazine, and issue, an article written by Wiley Clapp about the S&W 625-4 Springfield Armory 200 Year Commemorative .45 acp revolver appeared?

    • admin says:

      That’s a great question and one I cannot answer. Nothing obvious coming up in the search results. Might have to try and contact Wiley himself for the answer.

  2. Chris says:

    Its come to my attention that the small write up appeared in Wiley Clapps “Firing Line” column in the July/August 1995 issue of Handgunning. If anyone has an extra copy please let me know. Thanks!

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